This issue contains four topics:

1. WATCH YOUR VITAMIN INTAKE

2. FOUR FOOD TIPS

3.PROVOCATIVE TRIGLYCERIDES AND CHOLESTEROL STUDY

4.NEW SCIENTIFIC STUDY - PTH

So here we go.....

WATCH YOUR VITAMINS!.

Too much Vitamin A is not good for your bones. Researchers at Nissei Hospital and Research Laboratory (Japan) studied various vitamins and Osteoporosis. They concluded: “Excess vitamin A intake was also associated with lower bone mineral density and higher risk of hip fractures. “ Nippon Rinsho Sept. 2006.

FOOD TIPS

a. Bones of both women and men benefit from eating fruit and vegetables. Those eating many fruits and vegetables have denser bones than those who do not.

b. Figs! .Good news about dried figs.. Figs are high in calcium – even higher than many foods usually associated with calcium..

c. Walnuts and Flax seed. Last month the Nutrition Journal published a study showing that women consuming walnuts and flax seeds in their diet had lower bone resorption [removal of bone.]. Why not add some to your salads or snacks a few times a week?

d. Soda. Is it all bad? The Framingham study shows that all cola drinks have a negative effect on bone density. But non-colas may be OK. The evidence is not overwhelming but the study says: “no significant relations between non-cola carbonated beverage consumption and BMD” , Maybe the seltzer companies should use this in their ads.

PROVOCATIVE STUDY OF TRIGLYCERIDES AND CHOLESTEROL

The Journal of Women’s Health published a study done at the University of Connecticut that concluded: “These findings indicate that higher levels of serum triglycerides and cholesterol are positively associated with BMD of various skeletal sites. The mechanism of this association is not clear, and studies are needed to clarify this relationship”

NEW PTH RESEARCH.

New research shows that in patients with severe osteoporosis, human parathyroid hormone reduced the risk for new vertebral and nonvertebral fractures in post-menopausal women with previous fractures and increases bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and femoral neck

That's it. I hope you found at least 2 tihng that you can use.

Next issue comes in 2 weeks. I just gained access to full texts of over a hundred studies so I expect to have some interesting things to share with you.

PASSWORD: Your special section of the web site has a password. Go to: http://www.osteopenia3.com/special.html

Password: Vitamin D (Type it in the pop-up box.)

'Til next time..... Kate